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NEWS from Haiti
April 2014
Archimedes Project 
Group from Tufts University parters with Deep Springs
 

The Archimedes Project, a group of students and graduate students from Tufts University in Boston will be partnering with Deep Springs this summer and fall.   The focus of the project is to pilot household water treatment in the urban slum areas of Port-au-Prince.

The Deep Springs strategy has focused exclusively in rural areas since our founding in 2006.   This unique pilot project will serve as a test of the urban market, to see if there is sufficient need and demand for our locally-produced Gadyen Dlo brand chlorine to justify widespread expansion into cities.
 
Faith Wallace-Gadsden will be leading the Archimedes Project team.   She recently completed her PhD at Tufts University on the microbiology of cholera.  The impetus for the project was a conference that Tufts organized in November in which Michael Ritter served as a panel expert on household water treatment.  The students competed in a project design competition and the winning proposal is what Archemedes will be implementing with Deep Springs.
Earth Day 2014 
Tuesday, March 22nd
 
For Earth Day, Deep Springs celebrated by reminding our supporters and the public of the importance of water.   Water, covering 71% of the earth's surface, is a resource that has been taken for granted until recently.  Water is quickly moving to the forefront of environmental concerns, and for good reason.
 
We typically think of pollution as the main area of concern.  But in countries like Haiti, deforestation is the main culprit.  Haiti, once part of an island of lush tropical jungle, is now almostly completely deforested.  The connection between forests and water supply has been clear to scientists for a long time.   Once those trees are gone, not only is there less rainfall, but the surface water pattern changes also, as vegetation and topsoil are lost.   Families who once had a reliable spring or small stream nearby, now have to walk two hours each way to fetch water.
 
 
Our focus on water, making sure that drinking water in the home is safe, is of key importance.  But we also collaborate with other initiatives that help families improve their source of water.   In addition, Haitians are learning the hard lesson about how important those trees are.   Most rural Haitians still cut trees to produce charcoal for cooking - and this is the primary reason for deforestation in the past 50 years.   We are supportive of all reforestation projects in Haiti, recognizing this as a key step in helping Haitians stabalize their water sources.
 
Photo credit:  Partners in Health
Did You Know....? 
 
 
HAITI FACT  
  • 22% of children are underweight
  • 9% are emaciated
  • 24% of children suffer stunted growth
 
 
WATER FACT
 
 
In Haiti only 54% of people have access to clean drinking water.
 
Source:  UNICEF
 
New Seal of Approval 
Deep Springs earns GuideStar's Gold Level
 
Indicating our commitment to the highest standards of transparency and financial accountability, Deep Springs just earned the Gold level as a voluntary participant in the GuideStar Exchange.
 
GuideStar is the premier online portal for information on more than 500,000 nonprofit organizations based in the U.S.  The mission of GuideStar is "to revolutionize philanthropy by providing information that advances transparency, enables users to make better decisions, and encourages charitable giving."

Gold level means that we have voluntarily supplied the highest level of information and transparency related to:
  • Our Finances (including our IRS 990 reports)
  • Our People (Board / Staff / Volunteers Stats)
  • Our Programs
  • Our Impact
But don't take our word for it...our public reviews also average the highest level...
Add your own review of Deep Springs now.  Thanks for spreading the word!
Volunteers Wanted 
Check out these opportunities to make a difference
 

Communications Intern in Haiti:  We are still accepting resumes for this Summer as well as Spring Semester 2015.  This is a full-time internship in Haiti for a minimum of four months.   Strong preference for those fluent in French or Haitian Creole.  

Development Intern in Pittsburgh:  This is a part-time or full-time internship for a minimum of six months.  Strong preference for Pittsburgh native.  

Newsletter / Website Editor:   Are you a professional designer and want to put your skills to use for Deep Springs?   Send a letter of interest and link to your portfolio to Steve Bostian.


RaRa Festival 
Haitians put suffering aside and find reasons to celebrate
 
 "Rara" is a special Haitian street festival during Easter Week. The music centers on bamboo trumpets called "vaksen" as well as drums, maracas, and güiros.  Of course the music is loud and the dancing is lively - a welcome distraction from the daily hardships for the average Haitian family!  But it is also a reminder of the amazing resilience and spirit of the Haitian people - who recognize that life is always worth celebrating, no matter how difficult.  Leogane, where Deep Springs has its national office in Haiti, has the most famous of all Rara Festivals in the country.   
In This Issue
 
Purchase NOW and Save Lives!
Only $34 / family
 
The impact of clean water?
 
Their smiles tell it all!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Address postal inquiries to:
Deep Springs International
PO Box 694
Grove City, PA 16127
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